a delicious and healthy QUINOADOMAINELION PIZZA CRUST

Quinoadomainelion  Pizza  Crust

 

quinoadomainlion piza
quinoadomainlion piza

Want to fit more quinoa into your diet? Start with this recipe for quinoa pizza crust:

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cups (12 ounces/360 grams) Basic Quinoa (pages 12–13) or Pilaf‐Style Quinoa (page 14)
  • 1/2 cup (1 ounce/30 grams) finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • 6 large eggs
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 recipe Sweet and Tangy Roasted Tomatoes (page 27) or two pints of grape or cherry tomatoes, tossed with olive oil, salt and pepper to taste and roasted on a foil-lined baking sheet at 425 degrees for 45-60 minutes in the oven
  • 4 ounces/120 grams fresh mozzarella, cut into batons
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil

Directions

  1. Adjust an oven rack to the upper third of the oven and preheat it to 450°F/230°C.

  2. Heat the oil in a medium ovenproof skillet until simmering. Add the onion and cook, stirring until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 1 minute. Add the quinoa and Parmesan cheese and stir to combine. Then, with a rubber spatula, flatten out the quinoa. Reduce the heat to medium and cook about 10 minutes without stirring to allow the quinoa base to crisp.

  3. While the quinoa cooks, season the eggs with salt and pepper and whisk them in a large bowl. Pour the eggs over the quinoa and dollop the roasted tomatoes evenly over the eggs. Arrange the cheese in a circular pattern over the eggs.

  4. Bake until puffed and set, about 10 minutes. Turn the broiler on and broil until the frittata is puffed and golden and the cheese has begun to char, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to rest for at least 5 minutes before serving. Top with basil.

 

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Almond-Cranberry QuinoaDomaineLion Cookies

Almond-Cranberry QuinoaDomaineLion Cookies

these super delicious ​Almond-Cranberry Quinoa Cookies​. The sweet and chewy snacks have around 200 calories with 3 grams of fiber and 5 grams of protein per serving.

Ingredients for these deli cookies

    • 1 1/2 cups white whole wheat flour
    • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
    • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1/2 cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, room temperature
    • 1/4 cup sugar
    • 1/4 cup (packed) light brown sugar
    • 1/4 cup honey
    • 2 large eggs
    • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    • 1/2 teaspoon almond extract
    • 1 cup cooked quinoa, cooled
    • 1 cup old-fashioned oats
    • 1 cup dried cranberries
    • 1/2 cup slivered unsalted almonds
    • Ingredient info: White whole wheat flour and quinoa can be found at better supermarkets and at natural foods stores.

YIELD;  MAKES ABOUT 2 DOZEN

Preparation of your cookies

    1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Whisk flour, salt, baking powder, and baking soda in a medium bowl. Using an electric mixer, beat butter, both sugars, and honey in a large bowl until light and fluffy, about 3 minutes. Add eggs and extracts; beat until pale and fluffy, about 2 minutes. Beat in flour mixture, 1/2 cup at a time. Stir in quinoa, oats, cranberries, and almonds. Spoon dough in 2-tablespoon portions onto prepared sheets, spacing 1″ apart.
    2. Bake cookies until golden, 12-15 minutes. Transfer cookies to a wire rack and let cool. DO AHEAD: Store cooled cookies airtight at room temperature for 1 day, or freeze for up to 1 month.

Recipe by Jenny Rosenstrach

Nutrient Dense Spicy Quinoa Recipe

Nutrient Dense Spicy Quinoa Recipe.   Adopting a more plant based  diet is a goal of many, but it can be tough to know where to start. Vegan food doesn’t have to be bland and tasteless. On the contrary, vegan food can be some of the most flavorful food you’ve ever tasted. By utilizing the intensity of herbs and spices, you can ramp up the satisfaction and flavor profile of any dish. This can especially be true in regards to preparing seeds and grains that are virtually tasteless by themselves. 

Quinoa is different from grains like rice and oats in that it actually is categorized as a complete protein. It is one of the few plant foods that containing all nine essential amino acids. Although quinoa is commonly included in the same conversation as grains, it is botanically more like spinach. Actually it is the seed from a flowering plant. 

This unique seed is typically prepared by boiling in combination with water, similar to the preparation commonly used to cook rice. Quinoa can be served a sweet or savory dish, and can serve as a snack, side or a foundation of a dish. Sweeter quinoa dishes can be made with ingredients like cinnamon and pure maple syrup, while savory dishes can be made with ingredients like black pepper and onions. You could even add quinoa into your morning bowl of oats for some added protein and diversity. 

 A Recipe by Jen Miller

Course Side Dish

Cuisine Mediterranean

Prep Time 20 minutes

Servings 6

 

Ingredients 

  • 3 cups quinoa (use white, red, black or tri-color) 
  • 4.5 cups water 
  • 1/2 cup pumpkin seeds 
  • 1/4 cup hot sauce 
  • 3 tbsp olive oil 
  • Sea salt to taste 
  • Cracked black pepper to taste 
  • 1 Avocado 
  • 1/2 cup Shredded carrots 
  • 1 cup Broccoli 
  • 1 cup Mushroom 
  • 1 cup Cauliflower 

Get Ingredients 

Instructions 

  1. Boil the quinoa and wait till your quinoa has simmered for 15 minutes 
  1. Pour ¼ cup of your favorite hot sauce into the quinoa, along with 3 tablespoons of olive oil. Stir adequately until they are evenly coating the quinoa 
  1. Stir in ½ cup of pumpkin seeds, sea salt and pepper 
  1. Add optional items such as avocado, shredded carrots, broccoli, mushroom and cauliflower. Other ideas include dried fruit, more seeds (sunflower, sesame, poppy seeds) and nuts (macadamia, almonds, cashews, brazil nuts). 
  1. Serve and enjoy 

 

STEP ONE – BOIL THE QUINOA 

Using a large measuring cup, scoop 3 cups of quinoa into a large saucepan. Make sure you’ve got plenty of room to combine all of your ingredients when you take the quinoa off the heat. Pour the 4.5 cups of water in with the quinoa. Turn your stove top on high heat. Cover your saucepan with a lid and bring the quinoa to a boil. When the quinoa comes to a roaring boil, reduce the heat to a simmer and continue to cook with the lid on for 15 minutes. 

Feel free to peak on your quinoa at the 10 minutes mark to see how much water it has absorbed. Ideally, at the 15 minutes mark, the quinoa will have absorbed all of the water and will appear light and fluffy (similar to rice). Adjust this time as necessary, as every stove top is slightly different. 

 

STEP TWO – COMBINE WET INGREDIENTS 

After your quinoa has simmered for approximately 15 minutes, take the lid off and stir with large cooking spatula or spoon. You want to add your wet ingredients to the quinoa first, while it’s hot. This will make it easier for them to combine thoroughly. 

Pour ¼ cup of your favorite hot sauce into the quinoa, along with 3 tablespoons of olive oil. Stir adequately until they are evenly coating the quinoa. 

 

STEP THREE – ADD DRY INGREDIENTS 

After the wet ingredients are combined, it’s time to add in the dry ingredients. Using your large spatula or kitchen spoon, stir in ½ cup of pumpkin seeds, liberal pinch of sea salt and a hefty sprinkling of pepper. Sea salt and pepper measurements are up to, add them in to taste. For a starting point, aim for a teaspoon of each and work up from there. 

 

STEP FOUR – ADD IN OPTIONAL MIX-INS 

A great way to add in some additional nutrition is to pick some favorite veggies and add them into the mix. 

Some ingredients that work well in a quinoa bowl are avocado, shredded carrots, broccoli, mushroom and cauliflower. 

More ideas on potential add ins include dried fruit, other seeds (sunflower, sesame, poppy), and nuts (macadamia, almonds, cashews, Brazil nuts). If you do not care for hot sauce, you could opt for a marinara sauce to keep the flavor but omit the heat. Substituting in a pesto sauce is a practical swap as well (traditionally made with olive oil, garlic, basil and pine nuts). 

 

STEP FIVE – PORTION OUT AND SERVE 

After you’ve reached your desired flavor with your seasonings and toppings, it’s time to eat! Indulge in your nourishing serving of quinoa by spooning each serving into a dinner bowl. Add some fresh herbs like thyme or basil to the top of your bowl for a pop of freshness. Fresh citrus is another way to make your final product pop. 

You’re likely to find that this dish has plenty of flavor as is, though! The simple combination of hot sauce, sea salt and pepper elevate the flavor of the quinoa and make for a filling, mouth-watering dish that your whole family and array of guests will love. 

There is a multitude of variations on how you can prepare quinoa – this version just packs some added healthy fats and spicy flavor for additional satisfaction. To read more about the health benefits of adding healthy plant based fats into your dishes, check out this feature on 15 Health Benefits of Pumpkin. 

Have you prepared quinoa before? If so, what is your favorite way to prepare it? Tell us in the comments below! 

This vegan, gluten free, dairy free, filling dish lends itself to a lot of creativity and easy alterations. There are so many possibilities for additional ingredients or healthy swaps for you to cater this meal so that it adheres to your diet and doesn’t aggravate any food sensitivities/allergies. For example, olive oil can easily be replaced with coconut oil, grass fed butter, grape seed oil, macadamia nut oil, etc. Let your mind run wild and be creative with this meal. 

Look to rely on this recipe for potlucks, nights entertaining a crowd at your house, family dinners and even on food-prep Sunday. The great thing about this recipe is that it can be tweaked and is not easily messed up. Don’t fret if your measurements are not spot on. You can always add more water or more quinoa during the cooking process if the texture is not ideal. 

 

Quinoa a Different Whole Grain with Portobello and Peas

Why not Quinoa a Different Whole Grain !

QuinoaDomaineLion with Portobello and PeasDoesn’t the sound of mushroom risotto just pull you by the taste-buds? Creamy rice, earthy morsels of mushrooms, and often sweet peas buried in between. This luscious dish appears on so many restaurant menus as a standard option, perhaps due to its vegetarian-friendly disposition, and I’m tempted to make it on chillier nights when I feel like eating somewhat “light.” But it requires patience, attention, and some good stock to cook well, three things I don’t always have on weeknights.
Risotto doesn’t require, but is commonly drowned in butter or some other rich dairy products by chefs to avoid blandness. I’ve got a few different solutions for that, which has resulted in an entirely different, deconstructed dish from its inspiration.

Choose A Different Whole Grain:

Something you don’t eat often, so the novelty factor will add excitement. I went with quinoa, which is actually a seed, but cooks quickly to a nutty-tasting fluff. This was the most time-efficient option I could think of — save for couscous, which is not a grain but tiny semolina pasta. Quinoa is also exceptionally nutritious. If you’re up for a longer spell at the stove, here’s my recipe for “risotto” with spelt.

Build Flavor by Searing:

No sad, soggy bits of mushrooms this time around; I went for fat strips of portobello, which were lightly scored before searing on a pan. The scoring part just adds more edges to the surface that will become crisper. Giving mushrooms a good sear in any case brings out their rich flavor and adds textural contrast.

Try Crisp Shallots Instead of Softened Onions: Sweating chopped onions in butter or olive oil over low heat until translucent is one major time-suck in making risotto. It’s like a ritual that, once you get past this stage, the illusion of eating soon has been dashed. I’ve been there many times, resigned to my fate of standing over the stove for some time. But I’ve grown an appreciation for crisp, fresh tidbits that take no time to cook like shallots, which are milder and sweeter than large onions and a little of them goes a long way. This ingredient veers the final dish a little toward a quinoa salad or pilaf, as its flavor is not really integrated in the grains.

Heap on the Fresh Herbs Instead of Butter: Why stop at a sprinkle of parsley when you’ve gone and purchased a whole bunch, or have a plant bearing leaves ready to pluck? Pile on the green, flavor-enhancing goodness then, and mix it up with more types, like oregano, thyme, mint, sage, chives, or basil, like I’ve added here. (My spring herb pots are sitting pretty now; we’ll see how they hold up through the summer.)

Add A Squeeze of Lemon :

Okay, this might be officially a salad rather than anything close to a risotto, but a dash of fresh lemon juice really spruces up most anything. Especially meaty, browned mushrooms, which have no acidity of their own. Just another way to avoid barraging your dish with butter and build dimension. I just wish lemons weren’t so dang expensive on the East Coast.

In the end, we’ve come a long way from creamy-textured, pallid-colored risotto (and I do say that description in an endearing way). Instead, we have a warm quinoa dish with big chunks of mushroom and colorful contrasts, which took about ten minutes to make. We’ve also accomplished adding more protein (thanks to the quinoa, and plenty of peas) while making it not only vegetarian but vegan-friendly. This one certainly makes up for the Cinco de Mayo parties I attended over the weekend (did I mention parsley is very detoxifying, too?). Hope it’s a great fix for your time constraints and healthful aspirations in the kitchen, too.

Quinoa a Different Whole Grain with Portobello Mushrooms and Peas

(makes 2 servings)

1 1/2 cups boiling water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup quinoa
1 portobello mushroom, stem trimmed and sliced to 1/4 – 1/2″ slices
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup peas, fresh or frozen
1 small shallot, finely chopped
about 1/2 cup packed herbs, such as parsley, basil, thyme, oregano, mint and/or chives
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
extra tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil for drizzling (optional)

Bring the water and ¼ teaspoon salt to a boil in a small saucepan. Add the quinoa and stir. Reduce heat to a low simmer and cover. Cook 6-8 minutes, or until the water has been absorbed. Stir and set aside.

Gently score a cross-hatch pattern onto one side of each mushroom slice. Heat the 2 Tb oil in a heavy-bottomed skillet over high heat until very hot. Place the mushrooms scored side-down in the oil and let cook for about 1 minute. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Peek underneath, and once the bottom sides of the mushrooms are golden-brown, flip to brown the opposite side, another 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

Meanwhile, bring another small pot of water to a boil and drop in the peas. Cook 2-3 minutes, or until peas are just floating and deeply green. Drain.

Toss the quinoa with about half the chopped shallots, peas and fresh herbs. Season with salt and pepper to taste and stir in about half the lemon juice. Assemble the mushroom slices and remaining peas on top, and garnish with the remaining herbs, shallots, lemon juice, and optional drizzle of olive oil.

Health Factor

Two brownie points: Full of fiber, folate, iron and protein, Quinoa a Different Whole Grain. A great grain – er, seed – to get familiar with. It’s such an easy substitute for rice and other grains that take longer to cook. You’ll also get protein from the peas, and plenty of vitamins and minerals from the copious amount of fresh herbs. This is a spring power meal, with no cholesterol and low fats.

by Cathy Erway

 

Superfood Mac n’ Cheese Tomato nutritious Bowl

A Quinoa Mac n' Cheese Tomato BowlNew Way to eat superfood

Ingredients:

1/4 cup quinoa
1 tablespoon grapeseed oil
2 tablespoons pignoli nuts
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup fresh spinach leaves
1/2 juice of fresh lemon
1/4 cup grated cheese of your choice (Kelly recommends a blend of Parmesan and Asiago)
4 organic beef steak tomatoes, top 1 inch sliced off, pulp and seeds scooped out

Directions:

Bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the quinoa, and cook until it is tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain in a mesh strainer, and rinse until cold; set aside. Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat, stir in pignoli nuts, and cook until lightly toasted, about 2 minutes. Stir in the garlic, and cook until the garlic softens, about 2 minutes. Stir in the quinoa and spinach; cook and stir until the mix is hot, and the spinach has wilted. Stir in the lemon juice, and the cheese. Meanwhile place tomatoes in a baking dish and place sliced top back on top of the tomato. Place in broiler for 5 minutes until softens slightly, but still remains intact. Take tomatoes out and place the quinoa mixture inside the tomato, like a bowl, and serve.

Makes 4 servings. Per serving (1 bowl): 155 calories,
9g fat (1.6g saturated), 14.8g carbohydrates, 2.1g fiber, 82mg sodium, 5.3g protein

Recipe provided by Lauren Kelly Nutritionist