a delicious and healthy QUINOADOMAINELION PIZZA CRUST

Quinoadomainelion  Pizza  Crust

 

quinoadomainlion piza
quinoadomainlion piza

Want to fit more quinoa into your diet? Start with this recipe for quinoa pizza crust:

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 2 cups (12 ounces/360 grams) Basic Quinoa (pages 12–13) or Pilaf‐Style Quinoa (page 14)
  • 1/2 cup (1 ounce/30 grams) finely grated Parmesan cheese
  • 6 large eggs
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 recipe Sweet and Tangy Roasted Tomatoes (page 27) or two pints of grape or cherry tomatoes, tossed with olive oil, salt and pepper to taste and roasted on a foil-lined baking sheet at 425 degrees for 45-60 minutes in the oven
  • 4 ounces/120 grams fresh mozzarella, cut into batons
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil

Directions

  1. Adjust an oven rack to the upper third of the oven and preheat it to 450°F/230°C.

  2. Heat the oil in a medium ovenproof skillet until simmering. Add the onion and cook, stirring until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, 1 minute. Add the quinoa and Parmesan cheese and stir to combine. Then, with a rubber spatula, flatten out the quinoa. Reduce the heat to medium and cook about 10 minutes without stirring to allow the quinoa base to crisp.

  3. While the quinoa cooks, season the eggs with salt and pepper and whisk them in a large bowl. Pour the eggs over the quinoa and dollop the roasted tomatoes evenly over the eggs. Arrange the cheese in a circular pattern over the eggs.

  4. Bake until puffed and set, about 10 minutes. Turn the broiler on and broil until the frittata is puffed and golden and the cheese has begun to char, 3 to 5 minutes. Remove from the oven and allow to rest for at least 5 minutes before serving. Top with basil.

 

QuinoaDomaineLion is available in Morocco                                                                  in White, in Red, in Black and in TriColor Quinoa

Order per whats-app 00212 6 5259 1798

https://www.self.com/

Quinoa a Different Whole Grain with Portobello and Peas

Why not Quinoa a Different Whole Grain !

QuinoaDomaineLion with Portobello and PeasDoesn’t the sound of mushroom risotto just pull you by the taste-buds? Creamy rice, earthy morsels of mushrooms, and often sweet peas buried in between. This luscious dish appears on so many restaurant menus as a standard option, perhaps due to its vegetarian-friendly disposition, and I’m tempted to make it on chillier nights when I feel like eating somewhat “light.” But it requires patience, attention, and some good stock to cook well, three things I don’t always have on weeknights.
Risotto doesn’t require, but is commonly drowned in butter or some other rich dairy products by chefs to avoid blandness. I’ve got a few different solutions for that, which has resulted in an entirely different, deconstructed dish from its inspiration.

Choose A Different Whole Grain:

Something you don’t eat often, so the novelty factor will add excitement. I went with quinoa, which is actually a seed, but cooks quickly to a nutty-tasting fluff. This was the most time-efficient option I could think of — save for couscous, which is not a grain but tiny semolina pasta. Quinoa is also exceptionally nutritious. If you’re up for a longer spell at the stove, here’s my recipe for “risotto” with spelt.

Build Flavor by Searing:

No sad, soggy bits of mushrooms this time around; I went for fat strips of portobello, which were lightly scored before searing on a pan. The scoring part just adds more edges to the surface that will become crisper. Giving mushrooms a good sear in any case brings out their rich flavor and adds textural contrast.

Try Crisp Shallots Instead of Softened Onions: Sweating chopped onions in butter or olive oil over low heat until translucent is one major time-suck in making risotto. It’s like a ritual that, once you get past this stage, the illusion of eating soon has been dashed. I’ve been there many times, resigned to my fate of standing over the stove for some time. But I’ve grown an appreciation for crisp, fresh tidbits that take no time to cook like shallots, which are milder and sweeter than large onions and a little of them goes a long way. This ingredient veers the final dish a little toward a quinoa salad or pilaf, as its flavor is not really integrated in the grains.

Heap on the Fresh Herbs Instead of Butter: Why stop at a sprinkle of parsley when you’ve gone and purchased a whole bunch, or have a plant bearing leaves ready to pluck? Pile on the green, flavor-enhancing goodness then, and mix it up with more types, like oregano, thyme, mint, sage, chives, or basil, like I’ve added here. (My spring herb pots are sitting pretty now; we’ll see how they hold up through the summer.)

Add A Squeeze of Lemon :

Okay, this might be officially a salad rather than anything close to a risotto, but a dash of fresh lemon juice really spruces up most anything. Especially meaty, browned mushrooms, which have no acidity of their own. Just another way to avoid barraging your dish with butter and build dimension. I just wish lemons weren’t so dang expensive on the East Coast.

In the end, we’ve come a long way from creamy-textured, pallid-colored risotto (and I do say that description in an endearing way). Instead, we have a warm quinoa dish with big chunks of mushroom and colorful contrasts, which took about ten minutes to make. We’ve also accomplished adding more protein (thanks to the quinoa, and plenty of peas) while making it not only vegetarian but vegan-friendly. This one certainly makes up for the Cinco de Mayo parties I attended over the weekend (did I mention parsley is very detoxifying, too?). Hope it’s a great fix for your time constraints and healthful aspirations in the kitchen, too.

Quinoa a Different Whole Grain with Portobello Mushrooms and Peas

(makes 2 servings)

1 1/2 cups boiling water
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup quinoa
1 portobello mushroom, stem trimmed and sliced to 1/4 – 1/2″ slices
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 cup peas, fresh or frozen
1 small shallot, finely chopped
about 1/2 cup packed herbs, such as parsley, basil, thyme, oregano, mint and/or chives
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
salt and pepper to taste
extra tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil for drizzling (optional)

Bring the water and ¼ teaspoon salt to a boil in a small saucepan. Add the quinoa and stir. Reduce heat to a low simmer and cover. Cook 6-8 minutes, or until the water has been absorbed. Stir and set aside.

Gently score a cross-hatch pattern onto one side of each mushroom slice. Heat the 2 Tb oil in a heavy-bottomed skillet over high heat until very hot. Place the mushrooms scored side-down in the oil and let cook for about 1 minute. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Peek underneath, and once the bottom sides of the mushrooms are golden-brown, flip to brown the opposite side, another 1-2 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.

Meanwhile, bring another small pot of water to a boil and drop in the peas. Cook 2-3 minutes, or until peas are just floating and deeply green. Drain.

Toss the quinoa with about half the chopped shallots, peas and fresh herbs. Season with salt and pepper to taste and stir in about half the lemon juice. Assemble the mushroom slices and remaining peas on top, and garnish with the remaining herbs, shallots, lemon juice, and optional drizzle of olive oil.

Health Factor

Two brownie points: Full of fiber, folate, iron and protein, Quinoa a Different Whole Grain. A great grain – er, seed – to get familiar with. It’s such an easy substitute for rice and other grains that take longer to cook. You’ll also get protein from the peas, and plenty of vitamins and minerals from the copious amount of fresh herbs. This is a spring power meal, with no cholesterol and low fats.

by Cathy Erway

 

All you want to know about Quinoa

all you want to know about Quinoa

What is quinoa?

How do you cook Quinoa. The high-protein, gluten-free food. And how do you pronounce it?

It’s high in protein, gluten-free and incredibly versatile. But what exactly is quinoa, why should you eat it, and how do you cook it?
Even if you have never eaten it, it’s very likely that you’ll have come across quinoa in supermarket or on a restaurant menu. A healthy substitute for rice or couscous, it’s become popular enough to warrant the UN naming 2013 ‘International Quinoa Year’.
 
So, what exactly is quinoa, why is it good for you, and what can you do with it?

 

What exactly is quinoa and how do you pronounce it?

Pronounced ‘keen-wah’, the part that we eat is

the seeds from the flowering plant chenopodium quinoa, which originated in the Andean regions of South America and has been farmed for food for at least three millennia.

Although it looks similar, and is used as a substitute for, rice and couscous, it’s actually a closer relation of beetroot, chard and spinach. Unprocessed quinoa seeds are naturally bitter, which has the benefit of deterring birds from eating them while they are growing.

Why is quinoa considered healthy?

Firstly, it is a ‘complete protein’, containing all nine amino acids, and has twice the protein content of rice or barley. Additionally, it’s gluten and cholesterol-free, and is a source of calcium, manganese, dietary fiber, iron, zinc and magnesium. It’s also very easy to digest.

How do I cook quinoa?

It can be prepared much like rice. It might need soaking first. Check instructions on the packet. Then boil two cups of water for every cup of the seeds, and simmer for 10-15 minutes. As the seeds cook, they open up and release small white curls of grain. Remove from the heat and allow to stand for 4 minutes. Then fluff up with a fork.
 

How is quinoa eaten?

After cooking, quinoa should be fluffy but still have a slight ‘crunch’ to it. It has a mildly nutty flavor. It can be used as a substitute cereal. In a salad mixed with leaves or vegetables. As a side dish seasoned with salt, pepper and butter or oil. Or as a rice-like accompaniment to stews, stir-fries or curries. It can also be utilized in the making of vegetarian burgers. Or even as a baking grain to make bread or muffins.

Superfood Mac n’ Cheese Tomato nutritious Bowl

A Quinoa Mac n' Cheese Tomato BowlNew Way to eat superfood

Ingredients:

1/4 cup quinoa
1 tablespoon grapeseed oil
2 tablespoons pignoli nuts
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 cup fresh spinach leaves
1/2 juice of fresh lemon
1/4 cup grated cheese of your choice (Kelly recommends a blend of Parmesan and Asiago)
4 organic beef steak tomatoes, top 1 inch sliced off, pulp and seeds scooped out

Directions:

Bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil over high heat. Add the quinoa, and cook until it is tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Drain in a mesh strainer, and rinse until cold; set aside. Heat the olive oil in a skillet over medium heat, stir in pignoli nuts, and cook until lightly toasted, about 2 minutes. Stir in the garlic, and cook until the garlic softens, about 2 minutes. Stir in the quinoa and spinach; cook and stir until the mix is hot, and the spinach has wilted. Stir in the lemon juice, and the cheese. Meanwhile place tomatoes in a baking dish and place sliced top back on top of the tomato. Place in broiler for 5 minutes until softens slightly, but still remains intact. Take tomatoes out and place the quinoa mixture inside the tomato, like a bowl, and serve.

Makes 4 servings. Per serving (1 bowl): 155 calories,
9g fat (1.6g saturated), 14.8g carbohydrates, 2.1g fiber, 82mg sodium, 5.3g protein

Recipe provided by Lauren Kelly Nutritionist