MoroccoQuinoa® in rice paper rolls

Create a kaleidoscope of color and flavor with these rice paper rolls which are gluten free, low in fat and kilo-joules.

INGREDIENTS

  • 100g (1/2 cup) MoroccoQuinoa®
  • 225ml water
  • 30g palm sugar, finely chopped
  • 5 teaspoons fish sauce
  • 1 tablespoon tamarind puree
  • 1 small garlic clove, crushed
  • 2 teaspoons lime juice
  • 3/4 teaspoon fresh ginger, finely grated
  • 400g beef rump steak
  • 2 green shallots, thinly sliced
  • 12 rice paper sheets, 22cm in diameter
  • 1 long fresh red chilli, thinly sliced diagonally
  • 12 large fresh mint leaves
  • 150g bean sprouts
  • 12 fresh coriander sprigs Select all ingredients

METHOD

  • Step 1
    Place MoroccoQuinoa® and 185ml (3/4 cup) water in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Bring to a simmer. Simmer, stirring, for 10-12 minutes or until quinoa is tender. Cool slightly.
  • Step 2
    For sauce, place sugar, fish sauce, tamarind, garlic and remaining water in a saucepan over medium-low heat. Cook, stirring, for 3 minutes. Simmer for 2 minutes or until thickened slightly. Transfer to a bowl. Stir in juice and ginger. Cool.
  • Step 3
    Heat a chargrill over medium-high heat. Spray steak with olive oil. Season. Cook, turning, for 4 minutes for medium or until cooked to your liking. Rest for 4 minutes. Thinly slice.
  • Step 4
    Stir shallot and 3 tsp sauce into quinoa. Dip 1 rice paper sheet in cold water for 10 seconds or until starting to soften. Drain on a clean tea towel. Place on a work surface. Place 2 chilli slices and a mint leaf along centre. Top with a little quinoa mixture, bean sprouts, steak and coriander. Fold in ends. Roll up firmly to enclose filling. Repeat with remaining sheets. Serve with the remaining dipping sauce.

    NUTRITION

    • 1618 kj
      ENERGY
    • 8g
      FAT TOTAL
    • 2g
      SATURATED FAT
    • 3g
      FIBRE
    • 33g
      PROTEIN
    • 43g
      CARBS (TOTAL)
    All nutrition values are per serve

    NOTES

    For a tasty Asian dressing, combine a little of the leftover tamarind with lemon juice, fresh lemongrass, brown sugar and fish sauce.

Author: Katrina Woodman. Image credit: Jeremy Simons.

Product availability and info of MoroccoQuinoa® ; Email to domainelion@gmail.com or Whatsapp, call 00212 6 5259 1798

 

 

Quinoa’s genetic secrets revealed

Quinoa, the sacred “mother grain” of the ancient Inca civilisation suppressed by Spanish conquistadors, could become an increasingly important food source in the future thanks to genetic secrets revealed in a new study.

Scientists said they have mapped the genome of quinoa and identified a gene that could be manipulated to get rid of the grain’s natural bitter taste and pave the way for more widespread commercial use.

Quinoa already grows well in harsh conditions such as salty and low-quality soil, high elevations and cool temperatures, meaning it can flourish in locales where common cereal crops like wheat and rice may struggle. But the presence of toxic and bitter chemicals called saponins in its seeds has been one of the impediments to extensive cultivation.

Plant scientist Mark Tester of King Abdullah University of Science and Technology in Saudi Arabia said the research pinpointed a gene that guides production of saponins in quinoa. This knowledge could enable breeding of quinoa without saponins, to make the seeds sweeter. Currently, quinoa grain must be processed through washing and drying after harvest to remove saponins.

“Quinoa is currently greatly under-utilised,” said Tester, who led the research published in the journal Nature. “It is highly nutritious, with a high protein content that, importantly, has a very good balance of amino acids, which is unusual for our major grains. It is gluten free and high in vitamins and minerals, too.”

Increased quinoa production could improve food security on a planet with unrelenting human population growth, Tester said. There are potential disadvantages to reducing saponins, perhaps increasing susceptibility to fungal infections or bird predation, Tester added.

Quinoa, which boasts a nutty flavour, can be used the same ways as rice and wheat. It can be cooked and served on its own, turned into pasta, put in soups, eaten as a cereal or fermented to ake beer or chicha, a beverage of the Andes. The crop was sacred to the ancient Incas, who called it “chisoya mama,” or the “mother grain.”

 

Veggie-Quinoa Soup

                                                                                                                  ACTIVE TIME 45 mins. TOTAL TIME 55 mins.

YIELD Serves 8 (serving size: 1 1/3 cups).

Ingredients
  • 1 cup uncooked quinoa
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 cup diced white onion
  • 1/4 cup diced carrot
  • 1/4 cup diced red bell pepper
  • 4 garlic cloves, sliced
  • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, minced
  • 3/4 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 6 cups unsalted chicken stock
  • 1/4 cup diced russet potato
  • 1/4 cup diced peeled sweet potato
  • 1/4 cup diced peeled celery root
  • 1/2 cup diced zucchini
  • 1/2 cup thinly sliced Brussels sprouts
  • 1/4 cup roughly chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt

How to Make It                                                                                                                Preheat oven to 325°F.

  1. Spread quinoa in a thin layer on a rimmed baking sheet; bake at 325°F until browned, about 30 minutes, stirring every 10 minutes.
  2. Heat a large stockpot over medium. Add oil. Add onion, carrot, bell pepper, and garlic; cover and cook 10 minutes or until vegetables are tender, stirring occasionally. Uncover and stir in rosemary and cumin; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Stir in stock, potatoes, celery root, and toasted quinoa. Increase heat to high; bring to a boil. Cover and reduce heat to medium; cook 12 minutes. Stir in zucchini and Brussels sprouts; cook until vegetables and quinoa are tender, about 2 minutes. Stir in parsley and salt.
Product availability and info ; Email to domainelion@gmail.com or Whats-app, call 00212 6 5259 1798
Photo: Greg Dupree; Styling: Ginny Branch Stelling

Healthy Vegan Quinoa Pancakes

Healthy Vegan Quinoa Pancakes

Ingredients:1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1 tbsp brown sugar
1 tbsp maple syrup
pinch of salt
1 ½ cup of vegan milk with 1 tbsp vinegar
1 tsp vanilla extract
3 tbsp coconut oil
½ cup dry quinoa
1 tbsp vegan butter

Optional:
Maple syrup for topping
Fruit

Directions:

Cook ½ dry quinoa in 1 ½ cups of water until the quinoa is nice and fluffy about 15 minutes.
Combine the milk with the vinegar and set aside for a few minutes. Meanwhile sift all the dry ingredients into a large bowl and combine.
In the bowl with the milk add the maple syrup, vanilla and oil and stir well.
Add the quinoa to the dry ingredients and combine the liquids with the dry ingredients and mix.
Heat a pan with vegan butter or coconut oil and drop 3 tbsp worth of batter into the pan. Cook until bubbles form on the top and the sides turn brown, then flip and cook for another minute on medium heat.
Serve on a plate and drizzle with syrup if you like.

Enjoy!

Quinoa , a super healthy food

White Quinoa in hand

Quinoa contains the plant compounds quercetin and kaempferol
The health effects of real foods go way beyond the vitamins and minerals we’re all familiar with.
There are thousands of trace nutrients in there, some of which are extremely healthy.
This includes interesting molecules called flavonoids, which are plant antioxidants that have been shown to have all sorts of beneficial effects on health.
Two flavonoids that have been particularly well studied are quercetin and kaempferol, and they happen to be found in large amounts in quinoa .
In fact, the quercetin content of quinoa is even higher than typical high-quercetin foods like cranberries.
These important molecules have been shown to have                         anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, anti-cancer and anti-depressant effects in animal studies .
By including quinoa in your diet, you will significantly increase your total intake of these (and other) important nutrients.

Bottom Line: It contains large amounts of flavonoids, including quercetin and kaempferol. These are potent plant antioxidants with numerous health benefits.
MoroccoQuinoa® and MarocQuinoa® are supplied by           Domaine Lion Agriculture Sarl to the Moroccan special food shops and to the more Western orientated Restaurants in Morocco.